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Will MySQL Survive
 

Will Oracle kill MySQL or slowly fold it into its own database? Common sense suggests that Oracle will gain in the database space from owning MySQL. Sun had a huge SMB base for this product and a steady revenue stream of about 3% of its revenues accrued from this product. MySQL represents an opportunity for Oracle to garner additional revenue from the subscription license base but the company needs to position MySQL clearly in the context of its existing database offerings. MySQL will also give Oracle a weapon to take on Microsoft in the SMB space where the SQL Server enjoys strong market acceptance.

MySQL has achieved high adoption as a backend database for small to moderately sized Web-based applications and is extensively used by universities and SMBs. Killing MySQL would be a huge mistake.

SoftTree has enhanced DB Audit Expert support for MySQL because we expect Oracle to invest in MySQL in an attempt to steal marketshare from Microsoft SQL Server in the SMB segment where Oracle’s flagship database is typically too complex to manage or too expensive to implement. We're betting on the come that Oracle will improve the product’s usability, auditing, encryption, and monitoring and create a seamless migration path from MySQL to Oracle DBMS. If MySQL fails in the SMB market, Oracle will most likely relegate it to the developer tool bin along with its other open source database products such as Berkeley DB and InnoDB.

Another unclear aspect is Oracle’s commitment to MySQL’s dual-licensing model (free and paid licenses). However, a portfolio combining MySQL and Oracle database management systems would enable Oracle to address a broad spectrum of application and database requirements for small to large enterprises.

 

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